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Floyd Bannister

1974 Alaska Goldpanners
Roster Statistics Results Schedule NBC

1975 Alaska Goldpanners
Roster Statistics Results Schedule NBC


 
PositionLHP
Out of Arizona State University
H/W ; B/T6-1 / 180 ; L / L
BornJune 10, 1955
HomeScottsdale, AZ
PrepJFK High, Seattle
1976 Draft 1st Rd, 1st Overall (HOU)
MLB Debut April 19, 1977

1975 Roster | Jim Dietz Bud HollowellEd Olsen // Gary Armstrong • Dave Baker • Floyd Bannister • Alan Belasco • Ralph Billings  • Pat Corcoran • Jeff Ellison • Greg Harris • Tracy Harris • John Hoscheidt • Frank Hunsaker • Steve Kemp • Marty Kunkler • Dennis Littlejohn • Mark Naehring • Grant O'Dell • Gary RajcichPete Redfern • Larry Reynolds • Bruce Robinson • Harry Rose • Dennis Sandoval • Dave Schuler • Dave Smith • Ron Smith • Wayne Steele • Doug Stokke • Clarence Syers • Thad Troedson • Chick Valley • Tom Vessey • Dartt Wagner • Steve Whitehead • Steve Wilkens • Mike Williamson • John Yandle | All-Time RosterAll-Time Lineups

 

COLLEGE BASEBALL HALL OF FAME - CLASS OF 2008

The 1974 Goldpanner season ended on Labor Day in Kamloops, B.C., Canada, as the team needed three wins to climb out of the loser's bracket to win the International Tournament.  Floyd Bannister won all three games that day and was named the most valuable player of the tourney to cap a brilliant season.

In his first Goldpanner season Floyd was 11-3 and had a nifty 2.84 ERA.  He also led the club in strikeouts with 98 in 95 innings.  This spring at Arizona State University Floyd became the nation's strikeout leader and took a 14-3 record with 175 strikeouts in 125 innings into the College World Series.   The 6-01 left-hander enjoyed a sensational high school career at Kennedy in Seattle where he went 15-0 and did not allow an earned run in 112 innings as a senior.  Floyd also played on two championship Senior Babe Ruth League teams, Stoen-Kassuba of Seattle, which won the national tournament one year and finished third his other season.   In the latter season Floyd was named the most valuable player in the national tournament.

Floyd Bannister - '74,'75

Floyd Bannister - '74,'75


1975 NBC World Series All-American

 

Floyd Bannister -1974,75
1970s All-Stars


SON BRIAN

"Every day, it seems, is Father's Day at the National Baseball Congress World Series. Jarek Krukow, the son of former Wichita Aeros pitcher Mike Krukow, who went on to a successful career with the Chicago Cubs and San Francisco Giants, played for the San Luis Obispo (Calif.) Blues, who have been eliminated.

Right-handed pitcher Brian Bannister of the Santa Barbara (Calif.) Foresters is the son of ex-big league pitcher Floyd Bannister, who pitched in the World Series for the Fairbanks (Alaska) Goldpanners in 1974.

Brian Bannister had appeared in two tournament games before Monday, pitching 4 2/3 innings and allowing one earned run." - Bob Lutz, Wichita Eagle, 8/14/01

ALL-TIME MENTIONS

Most Games Won, Season

T5. 11 - Floyd Bannister, 1974

Most Games Won, Career

6. 17 - Floyd Bannister, 1974-75

ARIZONA STATE

Had 38-6 record with 1.88 ERA in 61 Games

CAREER HIGHLITES

  • 1975 - Named All-American at ASU

  • 1976 - Named All-American at ASU

  • 1976 - Named The Sporting News College Player of the Year

  • 1976 - Winner of the Lefty Gomez Plate as college baseball's MVP

  • 1976 - Drafted Number One Overall by Houston

  • 1977 - Made MLB debut on April 19

  • 1977 - First MLB win on April 29

  • 1982 - Named to AL All-Star Team

  • 1982 - Led A.L. in strikeouts with 209

  • 1984 - Led A.L. in victories with 20


1974 Alaska Goldpanners
Roster Statistics Results Schedule NBC

1975 Alaska Goldpanners
Roster Statistics Results Schedule NBC

Batting Stats

YEARGABRHBI2B3BHRBBSOSBAVG.POS.
1974197041000010.571P

1975

120000000000.000P
YEARGABRHBI2B3BHRBBSOSBAVG.POS.

Pitching Stats

Position Year ERA G GS CG So W L Sv IP H R ER BB SO
LHP 1974 2.84 19 15 3 1 11 3 1 95 73 41 30 46 98
LHP 1975 3.17 12 10 3 1 6 1 1 54 44 23 19 33 82
LHP Career 2.96 31 25 6 2 17 4 2 149 117 64 49 79 180


Minor League Statistics 1976

Pitching Stats

YEARTEAMERAWLIPGGSSvHRERBBSO

1976

Covington0.000013301300227

1976

Columbus1.50102431016441420

1976

Memphis1.5010610071136

 


Major League Statistics

Pitching Stats

ERA GS W L CG SHO SV IP BFP H ER R HR BB SO WP HBP BK
1977 Astros 4.04 23 8 9 4 1 0 142.2 622 138 64 70 11 68 112 6 4 2
1978 Astros 4.81 16 3 9 2 2 0 110.1 502 120 59 59 13 63 94 7 1 2
1979 Mariners 4.05 30 10 15 6 2 0 182.1 792 185 82 92 25 68 115 1 4 0
1980 Mariners 3.47 32 9 13 8 0 0 217.2 918 200 84 96 24 66 155 7 2 0
1981 Mariners 4.45 20 9 9 5 2 0 121.1 522 128 60 62 14 39 85 7 3 1
1982 Mariners 3.43 35 12 13 5 3 0 247.0 1,022 225 94 112 32 77 209 6 3 0
1983 White Sox 3.35 34 16 10 5 2 0 217.1 902 191 81 88 19 71 193 8 2 1
1984 White Sox 4.83 33 14 11 4 0 0 218.0 936 211 117 127 30 80 152 10 6 0
1985 White Sox 4.87 34 10 14 4 1 0 210.2 928 211 114 121 30 100 198 11 4 0
1986 White Sox 3.54 27 10 14 6 1 0 165.1 688 162 65 81 17 48 92 5 2 0
1987 White Sox 3.58 34 16 11 11 2 0 228.2 939 216 91 100 38 49 124 5 0 1
1988 Royals 4.33 31 12 13 2 0 0 189.1 816 182 91 102 22 68 113 6 5 2
1989 Royals 4.66 14 4 1 0 0 0 75.1 323 87 39 40 8 18 35 1 1 0
1991 Angels 3.96 0 0 0 0 0 0 25.0 104 25 11 12 5 10 16 1 0 0
1992 Rangers 6.32 0 1 1 0 0 0 37.0 173 39 26 27 3 21 30 3 3 0
  4.06 363 134 143 62 16 0 2,388.0 10,187 2,320 1,078 1,189 291 846 1,723 84 40 9

 

 

Where Are They Now? Floyd Bannister, pitcher

November 1st, 2007

By DAN RALEY
P-I REPORTER

He used a rubber-coated ball because it would bounce back to him. Hour after hour Floyd Bannister threw it off a cement wall at his south Seattle home, hitting marks he had drawn, developing pinpoint control that would be his pitching trademark and take him places.

Thirty years ago, Bannister became the state’s highest drafted baseball player — a badge of honor he retains today — when the Houston Astros made the left-handed pitcher from Arizona State and Kennedy High the No. 1 selection overall in the annual June draft. Chosen ahead of such can’t-miss players as Rickey Henderson, Jack Morris, Wade Boggs and Alan Trammell, his talent was unquestioned.

“They had talked to me quite a bit, so I had an inkling I was going to be that pick,” Bannister said. “They said I was an obvious choice, because they needed pitching and they were so far behind the Dodgers.”

While going first was an honor and no surprise, to say it was stress-free wouldn’t be as accurate as his pitches.

During those 1976 negotiations, the Astros wouldn’t budge for six weeks before agreeing to pay him a then-sizable bonus of $100,000. Where others signed for less money and quickly moved to the pros, the pitcher sat idle most of that summer, appearing in just seven minor league games.

Yet in his first spring training, Bannister made good on the investment, earning a Houston roster spot. He embarked on a 15-year big league career that involved six teams. He pitched in an American League Championship Series and an All-Star Game. Bannister’s career record, 134-143, wasn’t nearly as good as he was, because he played for a lot of bad teams, namely the Mariners.

Bannister reluctantly left his hometown team as a free agent bound for the Chicago White Sox, with whom he had his best years, 16-10 in 1983 and 16-11 in 1987.

Bannister’s baseball disappointments were few, thanks to that wall at his home in Seattle.

After he was cut from the Kennedy freshman team, he made himself a dominant pitcher as a senior, going a dazzling 15-0 and permitting no earned runs in 112 innings for a Lancers team that captured the state title.

He won national championships with Seattle-based Stoen-Kassuba and the Fairbanks Goldpanners at the Connie Mack and semipro levels. He played in the College World Series with Arizona State, finishing his three-year career with a 38-6 record and a 1.88 ERA.

Bannister was a high draft pick coming out of Kennedy, going to the Oakland A’s in the third round in 1973. However, owner Charlie O. Finley was in a cost-cutting mode after winning a pair of World Series and didn’t make a serious bid for the pitcher.

Three years later, he wound up with Houston, though baseball’s best team at the time showed considerable interest. He would have looked good as part of the vaunted “Big Red Machine.”

“To be truthful, a Cincinnati scout followed me around and who knows, if I had gone to the Reds in ‘76, how my career would have gone,” he said.

Fourteen years after retirement, Bannister, 51, lives with his wife of 27 years, Jana, in Paradise Valley, Ariz. They have three sons, all right-handed pitchers, all pursuing high-level careers: Brian, 25, a rookie with the New York Mets; Brett, 23, in the Mariners organization, recovering from shoulder surgery; and Cory, 18, a Stanford recruit.

The ex-big leaguer is busier than he ever imagined, managing different investments and training players of all levels. He has an indoor mound, Astroturf and weights in a commercial building he owns in north Phoenix. In the same facility, he runs a photography studio as a business for his oldest son, personally building sets for everyone from ESPN to high-profile New York shooters. He’s remodeling a house in the area for that same son, doing the electrical wiring and plumbing.

Baseball still holds his rapt attention and keeps him fit. He’s actually on the other end of the pitching battery these days.

“I strap on the gear and catch guys and get a chance to see what they’re doing,” Bannister said. “It keeps me active. I like that. I throw batting practice. I throw practically every day to Cory.”

It beats lobbing them at that backyard wall, though it’s hard to ignore the first stop in making him that time-honored first pick.